News

4 years ago

Three ways you’re subtly alienating your staff – and what to do instead

Alienating your staff

Three ways you’re subtly alienating your staff – and what to do instead

Being a manager is no easy task. As there are many ways to utilise the personalities and strengths of a diverse group of employers, finding balance is essential. Too much control and you crush innovation. Too little and you risk the productivity of your workforce.

 

Alienating your staff is a primary concern. In a recent survey of 1,000 employees across various industries, 44% said that a boss has been the primary reason they have left a job. Addressing management issues is for more than just retaining your staff. Productivity and customer service will also suffer.

Here are three ways many managers subtly alienate their employees and some tips to build strong employee engagement.

Employee first impressions

When a new member of staff joins the team, it’s easy to forget how intimidating it is to be in a new working environment. They may seem fine after their first week, but spend the weekend ruminating over whether this environment is for them.

First impressions matter. If they feel that they’re entirely responsible for their own development or feel replaceable, you’re setting your new staff up for doubts and – eventually – turn over.

Ensure their first couple of weeks are upbeat and well-planned. You hired them with good reason – support them and allow time for development and adaptation.

Managing with fear

Put yourself in the shoes of your staff to see the negative impacts of a work culture built on fear. Every time you get called to see your supervisor, you assume it is something you’ve done wrong. Constant negative feedback and micromanagement create fear and innovation will suffer.  

Adopting direct, effective feedback and constructive training will flip a work culture of fear into a productive one. Your team will want to engage with you and communication will drastically improve.

Keep staff in the dark

When team members aren’t part of the bigger picture, they feel disconnected from the organisation and motivation suffers.

Wherever possible, management should share updates on long term goals and explain what this means for team members and future opportunities. It’s also a chance to encourage staff members to take on new responsibilities and projects. Build their skills and confidence to a level where you can take a step back and allow staff to work independently wherever possible.

Maintaining strong employee engagement with effective feedback, transparency wherever possible, and proactive employee enrollment is key to staff retention. It will create a work environment where you encourage and reward productivity.  

If you require help with your business recruitment, get in touch with PRS Recruitment today on 01782 213 116. We build lasting relationships with staff and businesses to form a transparent and honest recruitment service like no other.

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